Done Declared

Our History cannot be erased

With a deep, resonate voice – Paul Harvey gives us something precious to remember. Most citizens of the United States are unable to quote one line from the Declaration of Independence. Paul reminds us that when the courageous statesmen came together to sign this powerful document, they mutually pledged to each other their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. The place where the document was signed is now called “Independence Hall” and it is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The best men from each of the colonies sat down together for the signing which details our inalienable rights as citizens of America, the land of the free. These were educated, respectful, hard working successful men of greatness. There were 24 lawyers which included 9 Jurists who also worked as farmers, and owners of large plantations.  On June 11 a committee sat down to draw up a Declaration that spelled out their Independence from the British!  No more ruling by the foreign ruthless, merciless Redcoats!  While average working citizens freedoms were shrinking away, this noble group men came together to do something. “Let my people go!” Thomas Jefferson finished a draft of the document in 17 days. The Congress adopted it on July 4, 1776. King George had denounced all the American rebels and the countrymen were subject to a traitors death. The names of those who signed the Declaration of Independence were kept secret for six months. Each knew the meaning of the magnificent last paragraph. 56 men placed their names beneath that pledge, knowing that they were risking all they had ever owned or accomplished. They expected years of hardship and bloodshed, but their freedom and the freedom for the next generations was at stake! If America lost these same 56 were willing to dangle from a rope. Carter Braxton of Virginia was a wealthy ag  trader who saw his ships swept from the Seas. To pay his debts he lost his home and died in rags. Thomas Lynch Jr  was a third-generation rice grower, an aristocrat who ran a large plantation. With failing health he and his wife set sail for France to get treatment. Their ship never got to France. Thomas McKean of Delaware was tracked by the enemy that he was forced to move his family five times in five months. Thomas served Congress without pay while his family lived hiding in poverty. For the rest of the story — click this link.

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